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MTA Arts & Design Unveils New Posters for Subway Stations, Cars

“Harlem Serenade” by Yohey Horishita
“Harlem Serenade” by Yohey Horishita

A cultural collage inspired by Harlem, a glimpse of the moonlit city, a dreamy nocturnal kitchenware cityscape, a journey through New York’s famous landmarks, and a celebration of everyday moments and riders of the subway since 1904 are just some of the images that will greet commuters this year courtesy of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) Arts & Design art card and poster program.

Extremely popular with the riding public, the art cards and posters bring art and inspiration to millions of riders, providing a burst of color to the daily commute.  Three new art cards as well as two posters will be seen in subway system throughout the MTA system. The art pieces are exhibited throughout the year within the subway cars and for several months on the station platforms, allowing for a close-up experience with the artworks. 

MTA Arts & Design commissions three to five artists each year to create transit-related graphic art that appears on the horizontal interior panels in subway cars and also the vertically-oriented spaces on station platform walls amongst the advertising posters. The MTA initiated the Art Card Program in 1999, modeled after the Poster Program, which began in 1991 as a means of enhancing the station environment.

“Harlem Serenade,” by Yohey Horishita, brings the heart of Harlem to life in a cultural collage of city experiences. Encircled by piano keys, the city streets are filled with people. History comes alive as landmarks, musical instruments are intertwined with subway imagery, reflecting the music, people and culture of the vibrant Harlem community. Based in Queens, Yohey Horishita is a freelance illustrator and an art instructor. 

In Jasu Hu’s “Moonlight Moment," flashing lights become the starry night sky for city dwellers and visitors alike. In the city that never sleeps, travelers above and below ground move through the city as they commute toward their destinations. Hu captures a glimpse of energy as people travel with the moonlight. Hu is a New York City-based illustrator, conveying her perspective through elegant, emotional and conceptual illustrations.

Dan Funderburgh captured a dreamy kitchenware cityscape in his piece, “Night Kitchen.” The work evokes many of the cultures, flavors, patterns, and textures that were inspired by the city itself. Funderburgh highlights night bakers, line cooks and bodega chefs, who often work while the city sleeps to keep New Yorkers fed.  Funderburgh is an illustrator, artist, and wallpaper designer, while his personal work includes letterpress and screen prints, sculptures and installations that reflect historical ornamentation.

 

 

“Travels Thru New York City” by Steve Dininno captures the life of the city and the constant motion. As the lifeline of the city, MTA transports 8.7 million customers daily throughout the MTA transit network. Iconic landmarks mark points of travel on his journey. Dininno portrays the vitality, buoyancy, and energy that he experiences in the city that he loves.  With ties to New York City, Steve Dininno is an illustrator, infographic designer and presentation specialist as well as a painter and printmaker.  

 

 

People of different age, race, gender and culture have been using MTA services since the city's subway system began operating in the early 1900s. “Since 1904,” by Dongyun Lee, celebrates the diversity of New York City throughout history. An everyday moment is captured with families exploring the city, couples with flowers, skaters, and businessmen. Lee, a Brooklyn-based illustrator, has a background in Illustration and Communication Design and has created work that has appeared in numerous magazines, newspapers and advertising.  Lee also works on collaborative projects involving illustration and fashion.

 

MTA Arts & Design’s popular programs have received various awards and recognition nationally and internationally; most recently from organizations such as the Society of Illustrators/Museum of Illustration and American Illustration as well as the American Public Transportation Association. “The poster and art cards are extremely popular with customers. They are at eye level and add an element of fun and visual interest to the daily journey throughout the year. We have an excellent collection of eye-catching graphics artworks this year," said Lydia Bradshaw, the MTA Arts & Design senior manager who manages the graphics programs.  

The posters and art cards are available for sale at New York Transit Museum stores. Revenue from poster sales support the museum’s educational and exhibition programs. 
“Harlem Serenade,” by Yohey Horishita
“Harlem Serenade,” by Yohey Horishita
“Moonlight Moment" by Jasu Hu
“Moonlight Moment" by Jasu Hu