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Bridges and Tunnels Launches Oral History Project To Capture Memories Of RFK/Triborough Bridge

<p>Bridges and Tunnels and the Greater Astoria Historical Society are asking the public's help in capturing oral histories that will help tell the story about building and opening day ceremonies at the Triborough (now Robert F. Kennedy) Bridge.</p>

<div class="frame" style="float:right;width:390px;margin-top:0px;margin-left:8px;"><img src="/sites/default/files/archive/imgs/Opening_Day_Triborough.jpg" title="Opening day ceremonies for Triborough Bridge, July 11, 1936. President Franklin D. Roosevelt was at the podium. Credit: UPI" alt="Opening day ceremonies for Triborough Bridge, July 11, 1936. President Franklin D. Roosevelt was at the podium. Credit: UPI" />
<center><div align="center">Opening day ceremonies for Triborough Bridge, July 11, 1936. President Franklin D. Roosevelt was at the podium. Credit: UPI</div></center>
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<p>If you were a child and remember watching the cables stretch across the sky, if you had a relative who helped build the bridge, or maybe you heard Tony Bennett sing as a 10-year-old at opening day ceremonies in 1936, Bridges and Tunnels would love to hear your story! The project is being done in honor of the bridge's 75th birthday next month. </p>
<p>Anyone interested in participating should send an email with a brief description of their memory to <a href="mailto:bridgememories@mtabt.org">bridgememories@mtabt.org</a>. </p>
<p>A copy of the oral histories will eventually be made available to the public at the Greater Astoria Historical Society, which is working in conjunction with Bridges and Tunnels to mark the 75th anniversary of the bridge, which was renamed in honor of Robert F. Kennedy in 2008.  </p>
<p>The RFK/Triborough Bridge, which connects Manhattan, the Bronx and Queens, opened to traffic on July 11, 1936, and was the largest public works project of its time. Built at the height of the Great Depression, the creation of the bridge put thousands of struggling people to work. It also was New York City's first bridge specifically designed for the automobile. </p>
<p>"Recalling the past and the important role this bridge has played in the economic development of New York City is a wonderful way of honoring the hard-working people who helped build this unique bridge that links three boroughs," said MTA Bridges and Tunnels President Jim Ferrara. "We hope people will share their memories with us as we get ready to celebrate the bridge's Diamond Jubilee." </p>