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Verrazano-Narrows Tower Legs Getting Fresh Paint

<p>The Verrazano-Narrows towers are getting a "leg lift," thanks to a two-year, nearly $19 million project.</p>

<div class="frame" style="float:right;width:390px;margin-top:5px;margin-left:8px;padding-bottom:2px;"><img src="/sites/default/files/archive/imgs/VN_SI_Tower_Legs_July_2011.jpg" title="Verrazano-Narrows Tower Legs Getting Fresh Paint" alt="Verrazano-Narrows Tower Legs Getting Fresh Paint" /><br />
<center><div align="center">VN SI Tower Legs: View of the Staten Island tower legs under containment system taken from the Brooklyn side of the bridge. Once completed, work will move to the Brooklyn side of the bridge.</div></center></div>

<p>The project will strip away old, lead-based paint, rehabilitate steel where necessary and add three new coats of high-performance, lead-free paint.</p>
Residents in Brooklyn and Staten Island no doubt have seen the strange wrapping on the Staten Island tower leg, which is a containment system designed to make sure that the old lead paint does not escape into the air or water. The paint is removed via abrasive blasting and the particles are disposed of in strict accordance with New York State regulations.</p>
<p>Once the paint is removed from both the interior and exterior of the tower leg, any damaged steel will be rehabilitated and the structure will be completely repainted inside and out. After finishing the Staten Island tower leg, the contractor on the project, Corcon, will move over and repeat the process at the Brooklyn tower.</p>
<p>Work on the project began in late 2010, but the containment system, a shroud-like covering made of tarps raised on a pulley system, was constructed in late spring and paint removal began in July. The work is being done below the roadway and there is no impact to traffic. </p>
<p>Regular attention to painting bridges is critical to keeping them in a state of good repair. The paint, which is specially designed for use on bridges, provides a protective coating against corrosion. The Verrazano-Narrows is particularly susceptible to corrosion because of wind patterns where it sits in New York's Upper Bay and its constant exposure to harsh, salt water and air conditions.</p>
<p>Nearly 11,500 gallons of paint will be used to re-paint both tower legs. Parts of the Verrazano-Narrows tower legs were last re-painted in the late 1980s but some sections are original paint from the early 1960s when the bridge was constructed. </p>
<p>The upper level of the Verrazano-Narrows, connecting Brooklyn and Staten Island, opened to traffic in Nov. 21, 1964. The lower level opened nearly five years later. In 2010, nearly 188,000 vehicles used the Verrazano daily.</p>

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<div class="frame" style="width:390px;margin-top:5px;margin-left:8px;padding-bottom:2px;float:right"><img src="/sites/default/files/archive/imgs/VN_Tower_Legs_Paint_4.jpg" title="Verrazano-Narrows Tower Legs Getting Fresh Paint" alt="Verrazano-Narrows Tower Legs Getting Fresh Paint" /><br />
<center><div align="center">VN legs paint 4:  Cable and pulley system is constructed on the Staten Island tower legs in preparation for the tarps that will completely enclose the steel structure. </div></center></div>

<div class="frame" style="width:390px;margin-top:5px;margin-left:8px;padding-bottom:2px;float:left"><img src="/sites/default/files/archive/imgs/VN_Tower_Legs_2.jpg" title="Verrazano-Narrows Tower Legs Getting Fresh Paint" alt="Verrazano-Narrows Tower Legs Getting Fresh Paint" /><br />
<center><div align="center">VN Tower Legs 2: Side view of Staten Island tower leg completely wrapped in the containment system. Work began in late 2010 with actual removal of paint beginning in July 2011.</div></center></div>

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