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Court Square on the No.7 Line Re-Opens

No. 7 trains have resumed making station stops at the Court Square station in Long Island City.

Court Square Station image

The station was closed to service on January 21st in order to facilitate a major rehabilitation project.

The work included platform and windscreen replacement and the enhancement of accessibility features, which will make the station ADA compliant at the time of its scheduled completion in June, 2012.

During the closure, expansion joints, tactile warning (ADA) tiles and four new track drains were installed along both platforms. 510' of windscreen (platform wall) was installed on both the Manhattan and Queens- bound sides. The mezzanine was rehabilitated, new stair stringers (the sides of the stairway) and treads were installed connecting the mezzanine to both the Queens and Manhattan-bound platforms, and new conduits were put in to accommodate relocated automated fare collection equipment.

"Returning Court Square station to revenue service will once again allow our customers to take advantage of the recently completed in-system free transfer, and with full rehabilitation work nearly complete, the fast-growing area of Long Island City will have a refurbished and updated complex that will be fully accessible," said NYC Transit President Thomas F. Prendergast.

The rehabilitated mezzanine includes a relocated agent booth, new fare array control area and new stairs to both platforms.

Of special note is the construction of the new platform, which rather than traditional concrete is a composite of fiberglass and resin formed into panels. They are manufactured in two-foot by 12 foot panels and bolted together and fastened to the platform support steel. The advantages over traditional concrete are:

  • The composite platform is corrosion resistant. It will not be affected by de-icing salts and will not crack during freeze/thaw cycles like concrete. This reduces maintenance costs.
  • The composite platform is lighter than concrete. This translates into less supporting steel and less weight on the existing structure.
  • The composite platform installs faster than concrete panels. Because it is lighter, the composite panels can be positioned quickly and easily by hand, without a crane. On the Court Square project, this ease of installation was particularly important since installation of the two new platforms had to be completed in 11 weeks.

While this station rehabilitation is close to completion, work still continues on the upgrade and modernization of the No.7 Line. Please log onto to http://www.mta.info/nyct/service/building7update.htm for project updates.

Photo of Court Square StationPhoto of Court Square Station