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Buses Replace Trains Speonk to Montauk April 24-27

LIRR train service between Speonk and Montauk will be replaced by buses for 72 hours Tuesday through Friday, April 17-20 and again April 24-27 -; as the Railroad carries out the next phase of the $22.4 million rehabilitation of three East End bridges.

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The work on the Shinnecock Canal Bridge, the North Highway Bridge and the Montauk Highway Bridges, all located in Hampton Bays, will require the LIRR to take the single main track between Speonk and Montauk out of service for 72 hours from 2:13 AM Tuesday through 2:30 AM Friday April 24-27.

The track outage will mean significant schedule changes for Montauk Branch customers during both peak and off-peak periods.

The LIRR will provide buses to/from train connections during these work periods. On Tuesdays, 9 trains will be affected. On Wednesdays and Thursdays, 10 trains will be affected each day. On Fridays, 1 train will be affected. Customers may experience up to 39 minutes of additional travel time depending upon their origin or destination.

During the 72-hour outage, eastbound trains will terminate at Speonk and buses will carry customers to destinations east to Montauk. Westbound travelers between Montauk and Hampton Bays will be bused from their home station to Speonk and there board trains to points west.

The complete substitute busing schedule can be found in specially printed "East of Speonk" Montauk Branch timetables for the April dates.

Rush hour customers are reminded that buses will replace the following AM PEAK and PM PEAK trains between Speonk and Montauk during this outage.

Westbound

The 5:39 PM train from Montauk scheduled to arrive in Speonk at 6:49 AM will instead originate from Speonk on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday.

Eastbound

The 6:17 PM train from Jamaica will terminate at Speonk at 7:55 PM on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday.

The work on Shinnecock Canal Bridge, the North Highway Bridge, and the Montauk Highway Bridge, all constructed in the early part of the 20th Century, is expected to extend the life of each bridge by 35 to 40 years.

The infrastructure improvements, which got underway last fall, is being financed by the Federal Transit Administration and the MTA Capital Program.