Paint Project Underway On Bronx Side of Throgs Neck

<p>Have you seen the oversized white cocoon enveloping the Throgs Neck Bridge near Ferry Point in the Bronx?</p>

<p>Well, it is part of a $47 million rehabilitation project that will remove the last lead paint from the bridge, clean and repair steel and apply new paint to the structure.</p>

<p><div style="float:left; margin-right:10px; margin-bottom:10px;"><img src="/sites/default/files/archive/imgs/Containment_ThrogsNeck.jpg" alt="Throgs Neck containment area image"></div>

The work begins in early June and the white cocoon that is already going up is a fully sealed, environmental containment system where the sanding, blasting and repainting will take place in accordance with city, state and federal regulations.</p>

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During the paint removal, negative air pressure is maintained inside the containment to prevent dust and other particulates from escaping. Continuous environmental monitoring will be performed throughout the project, including air, noise and visible inspections of the containment system.</p>

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A total of 2.5 million square feet of steel on the Bronx approach of the bridge will be cleaned and repainted using about 45,000 gallons of paint. The work will be done through November this year, and again from March to November in 2013. The entire project is scheduled to be completed by early 2014.</p>

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"The abrasive blasting to remove the old paint is noisy and we ask for our Bronx neighbors' patience while this necessary work is being done," said Facility Engineer Ed Knightly. "The best news is that once this project is completed, the entire bridge will be lead free and it will not need to be repainted for at least another 20 years."</p>

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The work will be done Monday through Friday from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. and on Saturdays to make up any rainy days during the week. In an effort to be a good neighbor, contractor Ahern Painting of Queens will begin Saturday work at 8 a.m. instead of 7 a.m.</p>

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This is the last phase of an overall, $100 million paint program at the Throgs Neck Bridge, which began in 2006 and has included cleaning and painting the bridge's suspended spans, towers and the Queens approach structures.</p>

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Keeping bridges properly painted is critical to keeping them in a state of good repair. The paint, which is specially designed for use on bridges, protects the steel structures against corrosion.</p>