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Air Quality Data for Second Avenue Subway Construction Now Posted Online

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Metropolitan Transportation Authority Capital Construction has posted additional Second Avenue Subway air quality monitoring data on the MTA website.</p>
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Click <a href="http://www.mta.info/sasair">here</a> to view the data.</p>
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Ongoing air monitoring data will be posted on a weekly basis.</p>
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Data posted on the website reflect readings along the Second Avenue Subway construction site for Particulate Matter 10 (PM<sub>10</sub>), which is a solid particle with a diameter of 10 micrometers or less, that can have health effects when inhaled at certain levels over an extended period of time. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) sets a health based national air quality standard for PM<sub>10</sub> at 150 g/m3 measured as a daily concentration. Data collected to date has shown that levels of the ambient air are generally a third of the allowable standard.</p>
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The data is presented in easy-to-read charts broken down by location and week from monitoring stations along the 63rd Street, 72nd Street, 86th Street, and 96th Street construction sites or can be viewed in the aggregate from all 10 monitoring locations. </p>
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"This is just another step we are taking to ensure residents along Second Avenue that their air is safe to breathe," said MTACC President Michael Horodniceanu. "We will continue to make every effort to keep residents informed on construction activities and work to mitigate the impact of construction as, each day, we move closer to completing this vital project."</p>
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In addition to its ongoing PM<sub>10</sub> monitoring program, the MTA previously commissioned a separate Air Quality Monitoring Study conducted by the Parsons Brinckerhoff Air Services Group which tested for a comprehensive list of pollutants in the fall of 2011. This study was reviewed and verified by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation and showed that most measured pollutants were below applicable national air quality and industry standards. Exceeded levels of some pollutants did not coincide with blasting and were primarily attributed to traffic emissions and other local sources.</p>
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The study collected data for a comprehensive list of ten pollutants to capture the effects of construction activities. Ten air monitoring stations along Second Avenue (six stations located between 69th and 73rd Streets, and four stations located between 83rd and 87th Streets) collected air samples during construction activities continuously for one month from September 12 through October 8, 2011. The monitoring stations and instruments used were selected under advisement by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.</p>