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RFK Manhattan to Queens Ramp Moves To Next Phase

The $50 million design/build project to reconstruct the Manhattan/Queens ramp at the Robert F. Kennedy Bridge is moving to the next phase of construction.

A new traffic pattern goes into effect beginning Friday, Jan. 17  shifting drivers slightly to the right and onto the newly reconstructed portion of the ramp. Crews will then begin work on the remaining portion of the ramp, which is used by drivers traveling from Manhattan across the Harlem River lift span heading into Queens.  

"This project is progressing very efficiently, and drivers will quickly see that the new portion of the ramp is a substantial improvement,” said Senior Project Engineer Adam Rose.  

“When the work is finished customers will not only have an improved riding surface, there will be wider lanes and an emergency shoulder for the first time,” said Director of Bridges North Cassandra Edghill, who oversees operations at the RFK Bridge.

The 26-month project to reconstruct the 54,000-square-foot ramp includes removing the old concrete deck, replacing the steel support stringers, and constructing a new concrete deck. The ramp was originally built in 1967.

The contract is being handled by Halmar International, of Pearl River, N.Y., and its design partner, Hardesty & Hanover. Work is expected to be completed by fall 2014.

The ramp reconstruction is part of the nearly $1 billion in capital improvements planned through 2016 for the sprawling Robert F. Kennedy Bridge, which connects Manhattan, the Bronx and Queens and carries an average 170,000 vehicles daily.

 

 

 

 

 

Crews demolish portion of Manhattan/Queens ramp originally built in 1967
Crews demolish portion of Manhattan/Queens ramp originally built in 1967
Using same footprint, workers rebuild portion of Manhattan/Queens ramp
Using same footprint, workers rebuild portion of Manhattan/Queens ramp
The new Manhattan/Queens ramp begins to take shape
The new Manhattan/Queens ramp begins to take shape